How much is a 1963 steel penny worth?

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How much is a 1963 steel penny worth?

How much is a 1963 steel penny worth?

The 1963 proof pennies were struck at the Philadelphia Mint to the tune of 3,075,645 pieces. How much they’re worth: Most 1963 proof pennies are worth around 75 cents to $2.50 each.

How much money can I get for a 1963 penny?

The 1963 penny with no mint mark and the 1963 D penny are each worth around $0.15 in uncirculated condition with an MS-63RB grade. The value is around $0.30 in uncirculated condition with a grade of MS-65RD. Proof coins with no mint mark are available and they are each valued at around $1.50 in PR-65RD condition.

Do steel pennies have any value?

Value of a 1943 Steel Penny They are worth about 10 to 13 cents each in circulated condition, and as much as 50 cents or more if uncirculated.

Is there anything special about a 1963 penny?

Most 1963 pennies in circulated condition are only worth their weight in copper. The current copper melt value for each penny is about $0.02. These coins can only sell for a premium in uncirculated condition. Proof coins with no mint mark are available and they are each valued at around $1.50 in PR-65RD condition.

How much is a 1963 D Double die penny worth?

Coin Details

PCGS # Service PCGS Price GuideSM Value
37971 PCGS $55.00

What’s the value of a 1963 US penny?

The US minted the 1963 penny with no mint mark and also the 1963 D penny. The mint mark, when present, can be found on the obverse side of the coin below the date. Most 1963 pennies in circulated condition are only worth their weight in copper. The current copper melt value for each penny is about $0.02.

How much is a 1943 D steel penny worth?

The 1943 D steel penny is worth around $0.35 in fine condition. In very fine condition the value is around $0.40. In extremely fine condition the value is around $0.50. In uncirculated condition the price is around $10 for coins with an MS 63 grade. Uncirculated coins with a grade of MS 65 can sell for around $1,500.

Why was the 1943 Lincoln Steel Penny rejected?

Another reason for the rejection of the 1943 Lincoln Steel Penny was that the zinc oxidized quickly, leaving the coin dark gray and almost black. It used to start at the edge of the coin, where the manufacturing process left the steel bare.

When did the Lincoln Steel Penny come out?

The history of the 1943 Lincoln Steel Penny dates back to the intervention of the United States of America in World War II (1941-1945). Many resources were scarce or rationed during the years of World War II.

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